BC Bookbinding

Every creation is one of a kind.

7 notes

This is my fantasy novel I published in 2006.
I have wanted to bind my novel for some time now.
I finally got some free time away from commissions to make this happen.
This copy has extra material in the back of the book and I have added a full color map.

8.5 x10.5 red leather novel with decorative inlays and filigree. Hand tooled and gold design.
Handmade marbled paper for the end-sheets and hand sewn headbands. 
Finished off with a weighted ribbon bookmark.

66 notes

uispeccoll:

I want this to be running on a loop on a screen by my desk.

Found this from the Bridwell Library YouTube channel. “Bridwell Library houses theological research collections serving Perkins School of Theology and Southern Methodist University.”  They have more gorgeous bindings rotating on their YouTube channel if you click through. 

203 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Gold belt buckle from the ship burial at Sutton Hoo
Anglo-Saxon, early 7th century AD
From Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England
Like most Anglo-Saxons, the man who was buried at Sutton Hoo wore a waist belt. These were fastened with buckles whose metal and decoration reflected the wealth and status of their owner. From the belt usually hung a knife, and occasionally a leather pouch to hold personal possessions.
This magnificent buckle was made of gold and weighs 412.7 grams. It is hollow and made in two parts joined by a hinge placed on the back beneath the loop. The master-craftsman who made it devised a locking system involving a complex system of sliders and internal rods which fit into slotted fixings. These fill the interior leaving little space for the safe storage of a relic, a function which has been suggested for such hollow, high-status buckles (see the buckle from Crundale, also in the British Museum). Reliquaries in the form of belt buckles are well known from the continent.
The surface of the buckle and the tongue plate are decorated with writhing snakes and intertwining four legged beasts. Their bodies are highlighted with punched ornament filled with black niello. At the tip of the buckle, two animals gently hold a tiny dog-like creature in their gaping jaws. These, together with the two birds’ heads on the shoulders with cruel, curving beaks, make this buckle one of the most powerful images from early Anglo-Saxon England.

Nice

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Gold belt buckle from the ship burial at Sutton Hoo

Anglo-Saxon, early 7th century AD

From Mound 1, Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England

Like most Anglo-Saxons, the man who was buried at Sutton Hoo wore a waist belt. These were fastened with buckles whose metal and decoration reflected the wealth and status of their owner. From the belt usually hung a knife, and occasionally a leather pouch to hold personal possessions.

This magnificent buckle was made of gold and weighs 412.7 grams. It is hollow and made in two parts joined by a hinge placed on the back beneath the loop. The master-craftsman who made it devised a locking system involving a complex system of sliders and internal rods which fit into slotted fixings. These fill the interior leaving little space for the safe storage of a relic, a function which has been suggested for such hollow, high-status buckles (see the buckle from Crundale, also in the British Museum). Reliquaries in the form of belt buckles are well known from the continent.

The surface of the buckle and the tongue plate are decorated with writhing snakes and intertwining four legged beasts. Their bodies are highlighted with punched ornament filled with black niello. At the tip of the buckle, two animals gently hold a tiny dog-like creature in their gaping jaws. These, together with the two birds’ heads on the shoulders with cruel, curving beaks, make this buckle one of the most powerful images from early Anglo-Saxon England.

Nice

4 notes

nucd asked: Where did you learn to make books? I've been watching tutorials online, is that a good place to start?

Hi.

To answer your question, read instructional books and follow as many tutorials as possible. The key is to practice, practice, practice.

Learn sewing techniques, try to make some of the tools necessary to construct your book, and always plan and sketch out your designs.

Do not be afraid to attempt a technique. You will only gain knowledge even if you do not properly execute it.

I hope this helps.

Cheers,

BCcreativity